Error message

  • Notice: Undefined index: value in googleanalytics_page_alter() (line 217 of /home1/gurahl99/public_html/sites/all/modules/google_analytics/googleanalytics.module).
  • Notice: Undefined index: value in googleanalytics_page_alter() (line 217 of /home1/gurahl99/public_html/sites/all/modules/google_analytics/googleanalytics.module).

The Making, and Origins, of My Waldorf Doll

 How to make a Waldorf doll- a doll designed to inspire imagination and made from eco-friendly products.                 

 

Step one: Cut out pattern

Step two: Sew together the arms, legs, head and body patterns. Leave openings to turn inside out and for stuffing.  Keep opening on the top and in the neck.  The yarn and fabric is organic and from This Child of Mine. The have a wide selection of materials in varying degrees of completion.

 

 

 

 

waldorf doll head

 

Step three: take the wool and make into a tight round ball, about the size of a grapefruit to a cantaloupe.

 

 

*Image from make-baby-stuff.com

 

I got the wool from an Etsy shop called BungalowBear; on her product description it says that the wool is ecofriendly, with natural grazing methods, sheep friendly and free from pesticides.  According to “Sheep 201: a Beginner’s Guide to Raising Sheep” there are several types of grazing from continuous to intense rotational (Schoenian, 2012). Continuous is the most natural grazing method but it requires that the area have sufficient forage, the growth of wild life is usually inconsistent and the manure unevenly distributed. The benefit is that the sheep do not have to be moved around and are less likely to be mistreated. In an email correspondence with BungalowBear she told me that “the wool comes from sheep that are raised in Northern CA” (BungalowBear email interview, 2014).  She was unable to provide the name of the farm, but with internet research I was able to several farms that fit that definition, one that caught my attention was Full Belly Farm.

*Images from BungalowBear Etsy Shop

 

waldorf doll instructions

 

Step four: Pull the head sleeve over the ball of wool.  Tie the bottom off so there is some wool down the neck. This is important so that there is wool in the neck.

 

 

*Image from mak-baby-stuff.com

 

waldorf doll kits

 

Step five: Tie a string near the center of the head horizontally, and one near the center of the head vertically. Optional: I like to take a small bit of wool, about the size of a grape, and attach it for a nose.

 

 

*Image from make-baby-stuff.com

 

 

 

Step six: pull the head skin over the head, after turning it inside out, with the flat side in the front. Sew the top closed so that the skin is smooth and tight.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step seven: turn the arms, legs, and body inside out and stuff with wool. Optional: make a bean bag, to fit into the main body to add weight.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step eight: attach head to body, put neck inside of body and sew together.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step nine: attach arms. Put a button on the inside of the arms; sew through the body and into the button on the other arm. This gives a secure and opposable arm. Use a 6 inch doll needle.

Step ten: repeat step nine on legs.

Optional step: decorate the face to desired amount using embroidery, fabric pens, or something else of your choice.

Step eleven: knit or crochet a new born sized cap in desired hair color. Sew the cap to the head.

 

 

 

 

 

Step twelve: If you want longer hair tie strands of yarn to the cap.

 

 

 

*Image used with permission. All the dolls were constructed as a get together with my friends.

 

 

Works Cited:

BungalowBear. (2010, February 15). Etsy. Retrieved January 29, 2014, from https://www.etsy.com/listing/114734432/eco-craft-wool-stuffing-two-pounds

 

Full Belly Farm | Organic Vegetables, Fruit & Wool. (2013, January 1). Full Belly Farm. Retrieved January 29, 2014, from http://fullbellyfarm.com/

 

How to Make a Waldorf Doll. (2008, January 1). Make Baby Stuff. Retrieved January 29, 2014, from http://www.make-baby-stuff.com/Waldorf-doll.html

 

Schoenian, S. (2012, June 1). Sheep 201: Grazing systems. Sheep 201. Retrieved January 29, 2014, from http://www.sheep101.info/201/grazingsystems.html

 

This Child of Mine. (n.d.). This Child of Mine. Retrieved January 29, 2014, from http://www.thischild.com/